Baby's Hands are Up

2015 ANOTHER YEAR OF NEUROSCIENCE KEY MESSAGES





These key messages were sourced from the Northern Territory “Tune into Little Ones” Key messages about children poster (2014) and Engaging Families in the Early Childhood Development Story developed by the Ministerial Council on Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA) now known as the Standing Council on School Education and Early Childhood (SCAEEC)

Key Message 3

CHILDREN ARE BORN READY TO LEARN

The brain develops in stages – new learning builds on what children have learnt already. 90% of a child’s brain develops in the first three years.  Children learn from the way people treat them and from what they see, hear and experience from as soon as they are born.



A child can learn about their body and the space around them when singing, dancing, playing and moving.  Children of all ages express themselves through music. Even at an early age children sway, bounce, or move their hands in response to music they hear. Many preschoolers make up songs and sing to themselves as they play.  Fine and gross motor skills can be developed through music as well an appropriate time to learn the names of body parts.  Nursery rhymes and simple songs sung with rhythm and repetition encourage the development of beat - a regular or predictable pattern.  



You can provide rhythmic activities for younger infants by rocking them or clapping and patting their hands together. Babies will respond with excited movements like swaying, waving, and bouncing.  Toddlers will start to march to the beat or play the pretend drums.  



DON'T FORGET that repeating rhymes and songs
encourages memory and vocabulary development.

REPETITION, REPETITION, REPETITION!



BABY'S HANDS ARE UP
Chant
Follow the actions in the song.  Substitute YOUR child’s name for “Baby”.
 
Baby’s hands are up
Baby’s hands are down
Baby’s hands are dancing
All around the town


Dancing on my knees
Dancing on my feet



Dancing on my shoulders
Dancing on my………………. cheek 

(loud raspberry on the cheek!!)
Traditional – adapted

Have your child sitting on your lap or on the floor when singing the rhyme above. Follow the actions in the rhyme  –  you could use your baby's hands to do the actions or have baby watch you do the actions.  Either way, they will love the song.  The huge, loud rasberyy at the end of the song demonstrates to your child that they are special and you love them very much.
 
Research shows that kids who are actively involved in music (who play it or sing it regularly)

SEE THE LITTLE MOUSIE
Chant
See the little mousie
(Using one finger draw a mouse on palm of child’s hand)

Creeping up the stairs
(Climb up the child’s arm slowly)

Looking for a warm nest …………….
(Continue up the child’s arm)

Quickly up there!
(Tickle the child everywhere - remember though to do this gently and for a short period of time)



Your child should be sitting on your lap or on the floor facing you for the rhyme above.  Make sure you repeat the rhyme to use both of baby's hands and feet – swap hands after each chant.  If this rhyme becomes a favourite  and is repeated over and over, eventually you can hesitate after the word “nest” before they get tickled.

Use different voices – high, low, fast, slow, silly voice etc if the child likes the rhyme.  This builds up an understanding of musical concepts and improves their listening and performance skills.  AND don't worry about YOUR voice because your child will just love it!



REMEMBER TO HAVE FUN 

AND ENJOY BEING WITH EACH OTHER. 

TIME IS THE GREATEST GIFT YOU CAN GIVE A CHILD.